A Brief History of the Authority

Established in 1949, construction on the original sewage treatment plant, near where the Youghiogheny and Monongahela rivers meet, was completed in 1960.The plant offered primary treatment only, as was the practice at the time. With advances in sewage treatment technology, the plant went through a large expansion, which was completed in 1976. This expansion added the secondary aeration system now in place that provides additional purification in the treatment process. A third expansion was completed in 2015, and added a separate treatment process known as Sequential Batch Reactors, and was designed to work in conjunction with the existing sewage treatment plant.




The Authority Today

The McKeesport Sewage Treatment Plant is an Activated Sludge plant that was designed to process 13 million gallons per day at normal flow and 56 million gallons per day at peak flow. It consists of the Main Headwork’s building, Plant Pump Station, 4 Sequence Batch Reactor tanks, 6 Aeration tanks, 6 Digester tanks, 3 Blower buildings, 2 Clarifiers, Chlorine building, 2 Chlorine Contact tanks, Ultraviolet Ray disinfection tank, the Control and Incineration building, the Maintenance Shop/Garage complex, the Administration building, and the 28th street Billing Office/Garage complex. Sewage flows to the plant from seven (7) different pump/lift stations: Long Run Pump Station, 28th Street Pump Station, Cliff Street Pump Station, Perry Street Pump Station, West Shore Pump Station, Ripple Road Pump Station, and Glenn Avenue Pump Station, through over 104 miles of interceptor and transmission lines.

The Duquesne Sewage Treatment Plant is also an Activated Sludge plant that was designed to process 2 million gallons per day at normal flow and 5 million gallons per day at peak flow. Although it is a much smaller plant, it operates in a similar fashion to that of the McKeesport plant. The Duquesne collection system was designed based on a gravity fed system, no pump/lift stations, and has over 31 miles of interceptor and transmission lines that flow to the plant.

The Dravosburg Treatment Plant is also an Activated Sludge plant that was designed to process 0.5 million gallons per day at normal flow and 1.5 million gallons per day at peak flow. Although it is a much smaller plant, it operates in a similar fashion to that of the McKeesport and Duquesne plants. The Dravosburg collection system has one pump/lift station and over 9 miles of interceptor and transmission lines.